Ryan Herbert, The GlassMaker (An Excerpt)

Act One, Scene Three

 

The bedroom of MELISSA, a twelve-year-old girl, in JACE’s house.  The lights focus on her bed where she lies, crying.  The bed is dark purple with an interesting stellar pattern.  MELISSA holds on to a stuffed animal.  JACE, her eighteen-year-old brother, sits on a stool by her side.  She is in pajamas, but he still has his suit on from their mother’s funeral.  He appears to have been trying to comfort her for some time. 

 

JACE

[slowly and taking thought to comfort her]

Shhhh…Lissa, you don’t have to cry.  We’ll all miss her.  But we’ve got to take steps to move on.  There’s so much…so much to look forward to. [Pause.  He scoots his chair slightly closer to the bed.]  You’re excited for the parade, right?  That’s going to be so much fun.  I’m sure that…I know mom will be watching over you during that.  [She takes the slightest notice of his words but can’t seem to stop herself from crying.]  Come on, now, Lissa.  I don’t know how long I can see you like this.  Don’t think this is easy for me…[His words seem to cause her to cry more. He looks ashamed.] I, I’m sorry.  That was wrong of me…You shouldn’t have your feelings dismissed.  [He considers for a moment.]  Here, why don’t I tell you a story, okay?  [Her eyes light up a bit.] It might help you fall asleep.  The story of the…the story of the…um…glassmaker.  The Glassmaker. 

 

The lights dim a bit but focus even more on MELISSA and, especially, JACE.

 

JACE

[artfully making it up as he goes, with meaning and a soft pace]

Once upon a time, in a far off land, there was a boy who was an apprentice glassmaker.  For his whole life, he lived in a gigantic castle with a moat, knights, and whatnot, aspiring to become the best glassmaker in the land.  [Melissa appears interested.  JACE shows a slight smile.] His master taught him how to craft the most spectacular glass in the world – stained to be azure, mauve, salmon, mint, goldenrod, anything [There are quick flashes of these colors.]- all in the renowned workshop of the castle’s central spire, also his home.  The boy was interested in the work, as it was all he knew.  But, every day, he would take time to look outside the room’s intricately arched window to gaze upon the path leading to town.  There, as he could see the sunset [The lights take on the color of a sunset.], a girl dressed in the most beautiful crystalline dress would walk towards the castle with a basket of flowers.  [Prismatic colors spread across the stage.]  She was a dazzle of colors, glowing like a prism hit with the sun’s last wish before nighttime.  Yet, out of all the rays, two crossed as their eyes would meet.  He could do nothing but smile, not knowing how much he charmed her.  She would throw up the bud of a forget-me-not, whisking it away in the wind with a kiss.  [Small, light blue forget-me-knot-colored dots gently flicker around the stage.]  Without a doubt, a strong wind would bring the small dot of blue up and up, high into the sky, until it landed at a tiny ridge outside his window.  Stirring with love, the boy would take the flower and mix it with the glowing material in the furnace, creating the most astonishing pieces of deep blue glass. 

 

MELISSA has fallen asleep.  JACE seems so absorbed in his own story-making that he continues.  The lights shift to look a strong gold.

 

JACE

[speaking powerfully]

The king was highly impressed by his work, so, soon after the boy turned twelve, he announced that there was to be a new master glassmaker.  The rite of passage to prove his skill was the only obstacle in his way.  Elated, the young glassmaker accepted the challenge, hoping to finally gain enough prowess to impress the girl.  [Pause.] The boy decided to construct thin plates of clear glass, each increasingly opaque and cloudy, that would be set perfectly into the central spire’s beautiful window that he knew and loved.  The girl could finally see his masterful work.  Every day, he constructed another perfect layer of glass, each slightly less translucent than the last.  [Lights on stage increasingly fade to a pale white.  Pause.]  Yet, he became upset.  As the months passed, it became more and more difficult to see the girl.  Her colors dulled, and soon he could no longer recognize her face.  Nonetheless, he would still gaze out at sunset to catch a glimpse of her, just to know that she still existed.  [Pause.  JACE speaks ominously and from the heart.]  On his 18th birthday, his master suddenly died, and the boy’s work was immediately accepted as complete.  His new title brought him no joy.  At sunset, he could not recognize the girl at all through the window.  Frenzied, the boy tried to run out of the castle, once and for all, to meet her.  But the door was barred.  [There are sounds of a door being shaken.  After a moment, the shaking ceases.]  All around him, he could hear the king’s towering voice, congratulating the young master on his permanent home.  All that connected him to the castle was a small crawlspace to keep him alive with air, sustenance, and work materials.  The boy screamed.  He went to the glass window and bashed at it with his hands [Sounds of glass being battered and shattered are audible.].  Only the most recent layer, simply because he applied it poorly, shattered.  His hands were bloodied.  The boy limped over to his bed.  Expressionless, he turned and stared at the window.  [Pause.] He could see nothing, [The lights shift to a dull blue.] save for a hue of blue along the bottom of the pane…

 

JACE glances over at MELISSA and sees that she is sleeping.  He sits there for a moment and looks far away, focusing on something intangible.  Melancholy, he stands up and shifts his way out of the room.  End of Act One, Scene Three.Ryan Herbert

The Glassmaker (an excerpt)

Act One, Scene Three

 

The bedroom of MELISSA, a twelve-year-old girl, in JACE’s house.  The lights focus on her bed where she lies, crying.  The bed is dark purple with an interesting stellar pattern.  MELISSA holds on to a stuffed animal.  JACE, her eighteen-year-old brother, sits on a stool by her side.  She is in pajamas, but he still has his suit on from their mother’s funeral.  He appears to have been trying to comfort her for some time. 

 

JACE

[slowly and taking thought to comfort her]

Shhhh…Lissa, you don’t have to cry.  We’ll all miss her.  But we’ve got to take steps to move on.  There’s so much…so much to look forward to. [Pause.  He scoots his chair slightly closer to the bed.]  You’re excited for the parade, right?  That’s going to be so much fun.  I’m sure that…I know mom will be watching over you during that.  [She takes the slightest notice of his words but can’t seem to stop herself from crying.]  Come on, now, Lissa.  I don’t know how long I can see you like this.  Don’t think this is easy for me…[His words seem to cause her to cry more. He looks ashamed.] I, I’m sorry.  That was wrong of me…You shouldn’t have your feelings dismissed.  [He considers for a moment.]  Here, why don’t I tell you a story, okay?  [Her eyes light up a bit.] It might help you fall asleep.  The story of the…the story of the…um…glassmaker.  The Glassmaker. 

 

The lights dim a bit but focus even more on MELISSA and, especially, JACE.

 

JACE

[artfully making it up as he goes, with meaning and a soft pace]

Once upon a time, in a far off land, there was a boy who was an apprentice glassmaker.  For his whole life, he lived in a gigantic castle with a moat, knights, and whatnot, aspiring to become the best glassmaker in the land.  [Melissa appears interested.  JACE shows a slight smile.] His master taught him how to craft the most spectacular glass in the world – stained to be azure, mauve, salmon, mint, goldenrod, anything [There are quick flashes of these colors.]- all in the renowned workshop of the castle’s central spire, also his home.  The boy was interested in the work, as it was all he knew.  But, every day, he would take time to look outside the room’s intricately arched window to gaze upon the path leading to town.  There, as he could see the sunset [The lights take on the color of a sunset.], a girl dressed in the most beautiful crystalline dress would walk towards the castle with a basket of flowers.  [Prismatic colors spread across the stage.]  She was a dazzle of colors, glowing like a prism hit with the sun’s last wish before nighttime.  Yet, out of all the rays, two crossed as their eyes would meet.  He could do nothing but smile, not knowing how much he charmed her.  She would throw up the bud of a forget-me-not, whisking it away in the wind with a kiss.  [Small, light blue forget-me-knot-colored dots gently flicker around the stage.]  Without a doubt, a strong wind would bring the small dot of blue up and up, high into the sky, until it landed at a tiny ridge outside his window.  Stirring with love, the boy would take the flower and mix it with the glowing material in the furnace, creating the most astonishing pieces of deep blue glass. 

 

MELISSA has fallen asleep.  JACE seems so absorbed in his own story-making that he continues.  The lights shift to look a strong gold.

 

JACE

[speaking powerfully]

The king was highly impressed by his work, so, soon after the boy turned twelve, he announced that there was to be a new master glassmaker.  The rite of passage to prove his skill was the only obstacle in his way.  Elated, the young glassmaker accepted the challenge, hoping to finally gain enough prowess to impress the girl.  [Pause.] The boy decided to construct thin plates of clear glass, each increasingly opaque and cloudy, that would be set perfectly into the central spire’s beautiful window that he knew and loved.  The girl could finally see his masterful work.  Every day, he constructed another perfect layer of glass, each slightly less translucent than the last.  [Lights on stage increasingly fade to a pale white.  Pause.]  Yet, he became upset.  As the months passed, it became more and more difficult to see the girl.  Her colors dulled, and soon he could no longer recognize her face.  Nonetheless, he would still gaze out at sunset to catch a glimpse of her, just to know that she still existed.  [Pause.  JACE speaks ominously and from the heart.]  On his 18th birthday, his master suddenly died, and the boy’s work was immediately accepted as complete.  His new title brought him no joy.  At sunset, he could not recognize the girl at all through the window.  Frenzied, the boy tried to run out of the castle, once and for all, to meet her.  But the door was barred.  [There are sounds of a door being shaken.  After a moment, the shaking ceases.]  All around him, he could hear the king’s towering voice, congratulating the young master on his permanent home.  All that connected him to the castle was a small crawlspace to keep him alive with air, sustenance, and work materials.  The boy screamed.  He went to the glass window and bashed at it with his hands [Sounds of glass being battered and shattered are audible.].  Only the most recent layer, simply because he applied it poorly, shattered.  His hands were bloodied.  The boy limped over to his bed.  Expressionless, he turned and stared at the window.  [Pause.] He could see nothing, [The lights shift to a dull blue.] save for a hue of blue along the bottom of the pane…

 

JACE glances over at MELISSA and sees that she is sleeping.  He sits there for a moment and looks far away, focusing on something intangible.  Melancholy, he stands up and shifts his way out of the room.  End of Act One, Scene Three.